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Many find mikveh to be a place of healing and rejuvenation. Being part of the practice of for married women to immerse in a mikvah after menstruation before have relations with her husband, mikveh is intimately tied to fertility. However, for those experiencing fertility challenges, it can be a painful reminder that conception has not occurred.

Our partners at Yesh Tikvah have recently worked with the Eden Center to produce a booklet called “Birkat Emunah: A Mikvah Resource” (the title means “Blessing of Faith”), which provides prayers (in Hebrew and English), practical suggestions and personal stories to help women gain more control over their mikveh experience while facing infertility or pregnancy loss. Read more about the launch as published in the Forward or download the booklet.

 

 

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The days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are called the Days of Awe. They are traditionally filled with reflection as we prepare to stand before God On Yom Kippur in judgement of our actions. The “awe” in Hebrew is meant to capture both the amazement and the fear of standing before God.
 
These days are reminiscent of the waiting period endured between fertility treatments and the following pregnancy test. The time is filled with a mix of awe about what might be happening, a heavy dose of fear that the intervention did not work, and sometimes a gnawing sense of impending judgement about ourselves and our situation.
 
So at this time of year particularly, with the Days of Awe passing slowly and the themes of fertility filling the liturgy, we are especially sending our thoughts and prayers to those among us who are struggling with infertility and fertility challenges.
 
The High Holiday prayers are recited in the plural (we) to make sure everyone knows they are not alone in their mistakes and in their ability to change. So too does Hasidah stand with you. You are not alone. Let our collective prayers ascend higher in hopes of wholeness and peace wherever the fertility journey takes you.
 
May your comings and going during this season and all of the Days of Awe be in peace and may you be inscribed for a good and sweet New Year.
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© Nick Cannella | Dreamstime Stock Photos

© Nick Cannella | Dreamstime Stock Photos

For Father’s Day, Hasidah is thinking of those who may not be celebrating. Some have lost children or fathers, some may have complicated relationships, and others are struggling to become fathers.

Av Harachamim, Compassionate Father, we are grateful for fathers and father figures in our lives and for the blessings they share that reflect your compassion. For those struggling to become fathers please, have compassion on them. Help them find strength in their relationships, peace in their home, and warmth in your care.

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Early in the Exodus story Pharoah’s dApple with shallow DOFecreed hard labor for the Children of Israel and that their baby girls may live but their baby boys may not. Despite this harsh reality, they continued to have children. The Midrash teaches that this is connected to apples. The women would take their husbands to the fields to entice them. They would conceive and then return to the fields to give birth and prevent the Egyptians from killing their sons. This all happened under apple trees as it says in Song of Songs 8.5: “under the apple tree I roused you; it was there your mother conceived you, there she who bore you conceived you.”

During enslavement in Egypt, one of the ways the Children of Israel expressed their spiritual freedom was by conceiving their future. Literally. Their hope was that the next generation would serve God and not Pharoah.

Some among us, however, are not free to conceive their future. Their hopes and dreams are enslaved by fertility challenges. Infertility can feel like a form of bondage: bodies that feel broken or unable to perform as we wish, decisions that seem impossible at times to navigate, and circumstances that seem out of our control.

On Passover we eat charoset to symbolize the clay our ancestors used to hold together the bricks they were making. The charoset also represents the sweetness of their redemption to serve God. By adding apples to our charoset, we invoke these symbols as well as the connection to fertility. We connect our past, present and future with the Song of Songs, the apple trees, intimacy, conception, birth and redemption.

Meditation for making and eating charoset with apples for those experiencing fertility challenges:

God of our ancestors, our souls are afflicted.

While we may be free in most ways, our dreams of fertility seem out of reach.

With the sweetness of these apples, comes the bitter taste of disappointment and loss.

Under the apple tree – shade us with your blessings.

Under the apple tree – may we find comfort with each other.

Under the apple tree – help us conceive a hopeful future.

Creator and Redeemer of all, let this charoset strengthen our souls.

May the sweetness of its apples linger with us.

Grant us clarity and hope along the way

to redemption.

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